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 Meet the Team - Dwayne

Meet the Team - Dwayne, Outfox Developer

At Outfox, transparency and community engagement are core to our values as a company. With that in mind, we'd like to introduce you to some of the hardworking members of the Outfox team. These are the folks behind the scenes here every day making sure that we are providing the best optimized gaming network available. Get to know them a little better in our series, Meet the Team. 

This time we interview Dwayne Vogler, who works behind the scenes writing the code that makes Outfox run!

Introduce yourself and explain what your title/role is for Outfox.

Hi, I am Dwayne Vogler. My title is Developer IV, which roughly translates to senior developer. In terms of the Outfox project, I am one of the people whose day-to-day job is writing the software that runs on the user's computer.

What is your typical work day like?

I proudly shun the idea of a typical day! But in all seriousness, most of my time is spent investigating issues with the Outfox client, writing code for new features or architecting systems that are still upcoming.

What is something you are most proud of in working on Outfox?

That is a hard question to answer! In a short time we went from concept, to working prototype, to a production-ready application with great ease of use on top of a complicated underlying system. Anyone who has been on that type of short turnaround project knows that in order to make it successful there are lots of moments to be proud of along the way. 

The Session Graph stands out to me. It is a massive bit of code that had to be easily modified as static concepts became animated reality and will continue to be somewhat frequently updated and reused over the life of the application. It is of course a big part of the user experience, but it was also highly volatile in how it could affect planning and execution of the product as a whole. In the end it saw all-nighters by no less than three people, four architecture revisions, a dozen demos, and something on the order of a hundred changes in about two weeks. I think everyone in development, product, and design got their schedule shuffled around a few times. But in the end we got a clean piece of UI and a clean piece of code that has been easy to tweak, will be easy to add features to, and to re-use across the application.

What are some of your favorite games, both past and present?

My parents started me on educational games before I could walk. So as with anything I have been doing my whole life, the "first I remember" is almost certainly a false memory. It was a Commodore 64 learn-to-type (or was it read) game skinned as a submarine side-scroller shooting words. No idea what the name was, or how many real games are mixed together in that memory.

Some of my favorite games throughout my life have been quite varied. In pre-college I enjoyed: arcade ports and the occasional MUD, RTSs, western RPGs and MMORPGs (Western and Eastern). In college and adult life my favorites have been: Eve Online, Minecraft, Bethesda RPGs and monthly games of fancy most of which I can't remember now. My current games of fancy are Factorio, ESO, and PUBG.

What are you looking forward to in the future of Outfox?

I look forward to custom game support because I want that feature! TCP connection support as well, because it is going to force us to pay back some tech debt. What I mean by that is, early on, we made some decisions in the code and architecture to get Outfox working that this far down the line are making the product less flexible. We knew at the time we didn’t want to leave it that way forever, and that is what is known as tech debt. Paying down the tech debt is changing your underlying systems to be closer to how you would want them to be for the purposes of easy maintenance and extensibility. The TCP feature is allowing us to re-work a lot of our oldest code into a more modular system that will be easier to expand upon in the future.